NAEA Awards Program

…Year Award The Lee T. Byrd Outstanding Volunteer Award The Outstanding Supporter of EAs Award The Bill Payne Advocacy Award The Emerging Leader Award The Founders Award The Founders Award recognizes significant leadership and contributions and service to NAEA and its members and whose leadership exemplifies the principles and goals envisioned by the association’s founders. This lifetime achievement award is the association’s highest recognition bestowed on a member. Year Winner 2020 Recipient Jean Nelsen, EA 2019 Recipient Alan Pinck, EA…

Affiliate Presidents’ Exchange Program

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What is an Enrolled Agent?

…total of 90 hours for each three-year EA enrollment cycle period). Because of the expertise necessary to become an enrolled agent and the requirements to maintain the license, there are only about 53,700 practicing enrolled agents. The Differences Between Enrolled Agents and Other Tax Professionals Only enrolled agents are required to demonstrate to the IRS their competence in all areas of taxation, representation and ethics before they are awarded unlimited representation rights to represent taxpayers before IRS. Unlike attorneys and…

EA Journal Editorial Guidelines

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What are Enrolled Agents?

…EA enrollment cycle period). Because of the expertise necessary to become an enrolled agent and the requirements to maintain the license, there are only about 53,700 practicing enrolled agents. THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ENROLLED AGENTS AND OTHER TAX PROFESSIONALS Only enrolled agents are required to demonstrate to the IRS their competence in all areas of taxation, representation and ethics before they are awarded unlimited representation rights to represent taxpayers before IRS. Unlike attorneys and CPAs, who are state-licensed and who may…

Models and Samples

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With every level of membership, NAEA gives you exclusive 24/7 access to valuable features and benefits, including the EA Journal, products, and business discounts that will boost your tax knowledge and make your enrolled agent career soar. If you are a member, please log in to view this page.

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2020 EA Journal Editorial Calendar

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NAEA Testimony on the Proposed Modifications to Treasury Circular 230

…Enrolled Agents whose members are tax professionals licensed by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to represent taxpayers before all administrative levels of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Enrolled Agents were established in legislation enacted in 1884 as part of an effort designed to help ensure ethical and professional representation of claims brought to the Treasury Department. Members of NAEA ascribe to a Code of Ethics and Rules of Professional Conduct and adhere to annual continuing professional education standards. Like…

NAEA Comments at IRS Panel Discussion

…place taxpayers in a worse position than currently exists, as taxpayers will assume a preparer holding a federal license has at least demonstrated minimal competenceiv. Centralization: Any program should build on the existing regulatory framework and consolidate administration and enforcement under the Office of Professional Responsibility. Why construct a parallel regulatory framework and enforcement entity for different groups of paid preparers? Centralization would create a variety of benefits: one ethics code; coordinated exams that would allow for advancement within the…

NAEA Comments for the Record at the Senate Finance Committee Hearing

…constructing a parallel regulatory framework and enforcement entity for different groups of paid preparers, the legislation would have consolidated all persons preparing returns (attorneys, CPAs, EAs, and other paid preparers) under the current regulations (Circular 230) and the existing Office of Professional Responsibility. In other words, there would have been one code of ethics, coordinated exams that would allow for advancement within the profession, and standardized continuing education requirements all administered centrally.We believe that this consolidation would have ensured uniformity…